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Saturday, December 4

  1. page Characters edited ... "But she lives here, Daddy." (Woodson pg 46) http://www.wordle.net ... Painted b…
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    "But she lives here, Daddy." (Woodson pg 46)
    http://www.wordle.net
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    Painted by KenzaLena-LenaKenzaLena- Lena is the
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    her mother died.Lenadied. Lena moves around
    "So you think we still gonna be friends?"
    "I doubt it," I said. "How come you want to be friends with a black girl, anyway? You should make friends with the white kids at Chauncey."
    (view changes)
    9:56 am
  2. page Characters edited ... "But she lives here, Daddy." (Woodson pg 46) http://www.wordle.net ... Painted b…
    ...
    "But she lives here, Daddy." (Woodson pg 46)
    http://www.wordle.net
    ...
    Painted by KenzaLena- LenaKenzaLena-Lena is the
    ...
    her mother died. Lenadied.Lena moves around
    "So you think we still gonna be friends?"
    "I doubt it," I said. "How come you want to be friends with a black girl, anyway? You should make friends with the white kids at Chauncey."
    (view changes)
    9:55 am

Saturday, May 29

Tuesday, January 5

Tuesday, April 28

  1. msg Discussion: Thursday, March 19 message posted Discussion: Thursday, March 19 Marisa, every thing we see in society is always bias. In movies, tv-shows, books and etc, blacks …
    Discussion: Thursday, March 19

    Marisa, every thing we see in society is always bias. In movies, tv-shows, books and etc, blacks are always the poor ones. Haven't you ever seen a caucasian person with no money? When driving to the mall there is always bums on the side of the streets and 99.9 percent of those people are white. You said blacks are always poor in real life but i have to disagree. I know plenty of blacks that have more money than they show. Have you ever seen a white without any money?
    9:19 am
  2. msg Discussion: Thursday, March 19 message posted Discussion: Thursday, March 19 Laura, I agree with what your saying. I have seen most teen movies such as "Mean Girls" a…
    Discussion: Thursday, March 19
    Laura, I agree with what your saying. I have seen most teen movies such as "Mean Girls" and thinking about the roles of the high schoolers you don't ever see a black 'wealthy' person on the movie screen. Can you imagine how it feels watching a movie and never seeing your race on camera? I'm sure that Woodson wanted us to be surprised because our world is extremely bias so when you portray the book as what you don't normally see it shocks us all. How did you feel about reading the book and seeing the 'unnatural' truth?
    9:19 am

Friday, April 24

  1. msg Discussion: Thursday, March 19 message posted Discussion: Thursday, March 19 I agree with marissa, this author was definitely trying to make a point, the best way to shatter st…
    Discussion: Thursday, March 19
    I agree with marissa, this author was definitely trying to make a point, the best way to shatter stereotypes is to give strong examples against them and this story contradicts the stereotypes on almost every level.

    Stereotypes are wrong because they take away our natural ability to think, empathize and most of all understand. Worst of all stereotyping puts limits on what individuals can accomplish even though they may have had extreme potential. Stereotyping has been rampant in our society and tv and other pop culture instruments have made it easier.

    The images we see too often enforce stereotypes and even creates some of them. but its not an easy fix, many shows have attempted the use of token characters and although it adds diversity, the forcing of token characters gives them an unnatural feel and the hiring of actors based on race is almost the wrong message.

    do u have any ideas on how to counter this? or how to promote diversity without adding the obligation to point out the diversity and without discriminating which are both counterproductive?
    9:48 am

Friday, April 17

  1. msg Discussion: Thursday, March 19 message posted Discussion: Thursday, March 19 I agree almost exactly on what Willow says. I also thought that the poor one would be Marie. It's b…
    Discussion: Thursday, March 19
    I agree almost exactly on what Willow says. I also thought that the poor one would be Marie. It's been that way in most books and movies, and even real life, that it has become a habit that you just assume that the story would be that way.

    In this book, the author does the exact opposite of what we are all used to seeing or hearing in our own world. It wasn't always like that, though. I agree with Willow when she says how racism probably started when the slaves came.

    I think the author does this for a reason. She most likely did it to prove a point since we just assume rather than really think about it. Everybody needs to learn not to judge a book by it's cover. That's the main reason we have different prejudices.

    What do you think?
    12:36 pm

Thursday, April 16

  1. msg Discussion: Thursday, March 19 message posted Discussion: Thursday, March 19 I agree with Rachel and Courtney that I am also ashamed to admit that I would have thought the blac…
    Discussion: Thursday, March 19
    I agree with Rachel and Courtney that I am also ashamed to admit that I would have thought the black girl was the poor one and the white girl was the better-off one. It is such a typical stereotype that some of us might not even think about it anymore. Mostly, when one meets a new person, they base their judgements on first impressions. One of the big impressions is the color of their skin. When Lena introduces Marie to her little sister for the first time, the first thing she notices is that Marie is black, and she makes that very clear in what she says.
    I definatly think that the racism against African-Americans started when slaves were first brought over. Before that it wasn't an issue. Now after hundreds of years, there is still racism in our world. Think about whenever you get on a plane and maybe see someone with a turban and automatically think they could be a terrorist. This person most likely is not a terrorist, and even though you know that, you might still be scared. I think the small amout of people from a different race may have created the prejudices for the rest of the population for that race.
    I don't think that anything specific can be done to stop it. It might always be an issue. People like Martin Luther King Jr. helped the movement for equality, and I think also simple actions, like the little girl talking to Kenza about tea, also encourages us to treat each other equally.
    All in all, I think that everyone always needs to treat each other with respect and equality, despite their race, gender or religion. And, like Courtney said, once those prejudices get in our head they will stay and people should try to stop themselves from thinking bad things. Hopefully, someday, there will be a generation where no one judges anyone without getting to know them first.
    Alright what do you guys think? What other prejudices are there? What can you do to help the fight against racism? Will you be able to treat people equally? Do you agree with my thoughts? (:
    10:34 pm
  2. msg Discussion: Thursday, March 19 message posted Discussion: Thursday, March 19 I am responding the message Dr. M wrote. You question was: “If - before you read this book - som…
    Discussion: Thursday, March 19
    I am responding the message Dr. M wrote.

    You question was: “If - before you read this book - someone told you that in this story there is one white girl and one black girl and that one is rich and lives in a supportive family and the other is poor and is abused by a close family member, then asked you to predict which girl is white and which girl is African American - would have correctly predicted the race of each character?”
    After reading your questions I got extremely excited to respond to it. I think my answer would depend on where these two girls live, because truthfully that plays an immense part in the question. If the two girls lived here on the east side of Tucson my answer would most likely be neither would live poorly, being that very little children on our side of town are usually living above average well off, stable lives. We never even think that maybe somewhere, on the other side of town, kids are wondering if their parents can afford to put food on the table for dinner, or if their fathers will sexually abuse them when they return home. Although, if I had to guess between the African American girl and the white, on our side of town, I would say the black girl would be the poor one. My reasoning is only because we have very little racial-diversity at our school, since primarily it’s filled with white kids. We live in a place where a large percentage of the students are white, so we live in a more, white-cultured society, so sadly an African American child would seem, somewhat like the odd kid out. Which to me is pathetic, but people really judge on your appearance because it’s a way to remember you. If you lined thirty white kids up, and one African American, and were asked to remember every child’s name, chances are you would best remember the African American’s because they are different from the rest. Which to me is an example of what its like at EGJH. We really sea of white children in our school. Of course we have some kids of different races, but the large majority is white. If anyone in our group agrees with my guess that the African-American girl would be less well off, do you have any other reasoning besides the one I stated? Even, if you disagree, why would say the white girl is the poor one? I also really think it depends on the location you put these two girls in, because in Chauncey all the black kids are the well-off ones. I must admit that I was kind of drawn to hearing that the society was more dominant by well-off African Americans. I think it was surprising because I feel somewhat in our society we are not use to hearing that kind of thing! Not really in racist way, we just kind of think that way. The concept is actually more interesting because you somewhat feel you are hearing the other side of the story, where African Americans are in charge of everything. In movies like Mean Girls, or other teen flicks, I’ve noticed these popular girls are usually, white. Plain and simple. So when you hear girls like Marie and Sherry being the popular girls, it almost comes as a shock. I felt kind of surprised about this, but I somewhat actually felt that even before we read the books, when we were doing author studies we realized Jacqueline Woodson specifically wrote about African American stories, so I think most of us were kind of keeping an open eye the situation they author put the black characters in. So, when reading the book, we paid more attention the fact Marie and Sherry were the popular ones. Partly by the fact it might have been new to our eyes, but the author really, in my opinion, wanted you to feel surprised. I think she wanted to make a point that maybe our society mostly likely wasn’t expecting that. We just assumed the popular girls would be white, because that’s what most teen-bopper movies or books tell us. What other influences do you think make us assume things like the color the main characters, and what their roll in the book will be? Do you think sometimes if we know the race of a character, we assume the role they will play in the book? If you would’ve guessed wrong on which girl was which race, why do you think the author wanted to have us feel surprised by the color and rolls of the characters?
    9:29 pm

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